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AMD Ryzen

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AMD perluas penguasaan segmen pemproses dengan pengeluaran siri Ryzen PRO
AMD lancar pemproses generasi baharu Ryzen PRO 3000


PENGELUAR pemproses terkemuka, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) meneruskan penguasaan bagi segmen pengeluaran apabila melancarkan pemproses generasi Ryzen PRO 3000 yang turut menyokong unit pemproses grafik terbina, Vega milik syarikat itu.

Susulan pelancaran pemproses itu, dua jenama pengeluar utama iaitu HP dan Lenovo akan menggunakan pemproses AMD Ryzen PRO dan Athlon PRO bagi barisan produk desktop mereka.

Ia bermula pada suku keempat tahun ini dan pelancaran pemproses kelas komersial itu dilihat usaha AMD untuk melebarkan jurang penguasaan bagi segmen berkenaan berbanding Intel.

Pengurus Besar AMD Saied Moshkelani berkata, pelancaran generasi baharu pemproses Ryzen PRO 3000 memberi fokus kepada sektor komersial atau pengusaha perniagaan kecil dan ini sejajar dengan matlamat mereka pada tahun ini.

“Pemproses generasi ini sememangnya direka secara efisien bagi menggalas tugas berkaitan pemprosesan data, rekaan dan pembuatan.

“Produk baru AMD ini juga menawarkan keupayaan kepada sektor perniagaan untuk melakukan pelbagai tugas dalam satu masa tanpa sebarang masalah,” katanya.

Pemproses daripada siri AMD Ryzen 9 PRO 3900, Ryzen 7 PRO 3700, dan Ryzen 5 PRO 3600 direka berasaskan kepada infrastruktur pemproses teknologi 7nm serta menggunakan teras binaan daripada ‘Zen 2’.

Ia juga menawarkan kuasa prestasi pemproses sehingga 12 teras dan 24 ‘Threads’ sesuai untuk kegunaan industri selain mempunyai keupayaan yang mengagumkan.

Berdasarkan bandingan prestasi, Ryzen 9 PRO 3900 dan Ryzen 7 PRO 3700 menawarkan dua kali kepantasan berbanding produk lain yang berada di pasaran.


 
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Ryzen generasi ke-5 versi G. grafik terbina
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kesinambungan dari post aku di atas
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AMD Mengemaskini Nombor Model Cip Pemprosesan Mudah-Alih Mereka
mudah alih ye
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Ryzen generasi ke-7 dilancarkan
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Adik aku dah beralih ke i7
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Geekbench was tricked: the Ryzen 7 7800X doesn't exist​

"Reality can be whatever I want" - Thanos​

By Isaiah Mayersen October 29, 2022 at 10:39 AM 7 comments
2022-09-30-image-3.jpg

WTF?! For the last few days, the computer hardware microcosm of the internet has been awash with theories about an AMD Ryzen 7 7800X that appeared in the Geekbench database on October 27. It hadn't been seen, heard, or rumored anywhere beforehand, which is almost unprecedented. Had AMD really made a 10-core Zen 4 CPU without anyone knowing?

Nope. Chips and Cheese has come clean. They fooled Geekbench with a phony name by spoofing the CPUID on what was actually a Ryzen 9 7950X system. They also disabled six cores and reduced the precision boost overdrive clock by 350 MHz to make it look (and perform!) like a middle ground between the very real 7700X and 7900X. I wonder what AMD's engineers thought when they saw the 'leaked' processor.

The Chips and Cheese team admitted to changing the CPU's name with an internal benchmarking tool originally designed to find bottlenecks in CPU design. It's been available on GitHub this whole time and still is, so if you want to pull off a similar prank, tag us on Twitter when you do. Here are some fun, definitely-real processors that appeared in the Geekbench database this week.

2022-10-29-image-5.png


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Chips and Cheese's tool, called PMCReader, abuses the way benchmarking tools like Geekbench read a CPU's name on AMD systems. The CPUID for AMD processors is stored across six MSRs (Model Specific Registers) that can each contain eight ASCII characters (so no emoji, sadly). Programs can read the CPUID by accessing these six registers. These MSRs are publicly available in AMD's PPR (Processor Programming Reference) papers, which explain that the BIOS sets them at boot.

Some AMD CPUs as old as Bulldozer allow them to be written to arbitrarily, although some architectures are more okay with name changes than others. Some MSRs can be changed later by programs with admin privileges, including those six registers. With PMCReader, you can give your CPU any name with up to 47 characters: check out Chips and Cheese's hilarious example below.


2022-10-29-image-6.png



Chips and Cheese say their tool can fool Geekbench, Cinebench, AIDA64, HWMonitor, the Blender Benchmark, and almost everything else they've tested. So far, the only exceptions to the rule have been HWiNFO and BenchMate (which borrows HWiNFO's tools) because they source the CPUID from a more fundamental level, much like the BIOS does.

It's actually been possible to spoof these benchmark tools for a long time with more than just silly names. Virtualization software like VMWare or CPUs from non-major manufacturers can falsify the CPU model, family, stepping, and manufacturer if you have the requisite expertise. However, with PMCReader, anyone can change the CPUID on an AMD CPU. From now on, it'll be tough to tell if a leaked benchmark result from an online database is real — which adds to the fun if you ask me.
 
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